Thank you, and best wishes!

We wish Sarah Jacobson best wishes as she begins a new career as a Registered Dietician!

sarahjacobson

Sarah Jacobson at the SNAP booth, still from Tilling Time Media

Sarah worked with Seacoast Eat Local in varying capacities over the years, beginning as an intern in the spring of 2010, through initiating and running the expanding SNAP Farmers Market program, and overseeing Seacoast Harvest and managing interns of her own. After taking a year to complete her RD degree at Keene, she returned to Seacoast Eat Local as our first full time employee this past fall. We will miss her expertise, energy, and ideas, and wish her the best as she puts her new degree to work melding her passions for local food and agriculture and healthy eating for a new audience.

You can follow her work as Local Foodie RD on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram

Posted in author: Sara Zoe | Leave a comment

NH Community Seafood needs volunteers!

NH Community Seafood’s CSF Manager has put out the call for volunteers. Their needs are varied (read: there’s something for everyone interested!). If you want to learn more about our local fisheries, please be in touch with Andrea Tomlinson at andrea.csfish@gmail.com

New Hampshire Community Seafood - give the gift of fish!Some of the possible work:

  • Putting labels on bags (500 used per week)

  • Assistance with member management using Small Farm Central website

  • Flyering to promote increased membership in NH Community Seafood

  • Social media support

  • Press release creation and processing

NH Community Seafood

Posted in seafood, volunteering | Leave a comment

SNAP comes to the Durham Farmers’ Market!

by Dyanna Smith, Seacoast Growers Association (SGA)

Happy Shoppers at the Durham Farmers' Market at the Churchill Rink lot in Jackson Landing

Happy Shoppers at the Durham Farmers’ Market at the Churchill Rink lot in Jackson Landing

Get ready for the freshest local produce, prepared foods and beautiful handmade goods to return in June with the start of the Seacoast Growers Association’s Durham and Dover Farmers’ Markets.

Monday, June 1, the Durham Farmers’ Market opens in its location at Jackson Landing across from Churchill Rink. The market will run every Monday, rain or shine, from 2:15-6pm until October 5.

Wednesday, June 3, the Dover Farmers’ Market starts up again in the Chamber of Commerce lot at the corner of Central Avenue and 6th Street. The Dover Farmers’ Market will be open every Wednesday from 2:15-6pm until October 7.

This season, Seacoast Eat Local adds SNAP/EBT services to the Seacoast Growers’ Association’s Durham Farmers’ Market. The program, enables low income customers to use their SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) benefits to buy locally grown foods directly from the farmers and food producers at the farmers markets.

“We’re thrilled to be partnering with the Seacoast Growers Association to bring our SNAP/EBT farmers market program to the Durham market this summer,” Sara Zoe Patterson, Board Chair for Seacoast Eat Local, explains. “Our community’s health is improved when customers buy fresh fruits and vegetables, and it benefits the economic viability of local farms.”

Farm fresh asparagus is in season now at the Seacoast Growers Association markets

Farm fresh asparagus is in season now at the Seacoast Growers Association markets

Market customers can also take advantage of the debit service, which acts like an onsite ATM, adding another layer of convenience to the farmers’ market experience.

Find out what’s in season, who will be at market, and what products are available by visiting the SGA website at www.seacoastgrowers.org. Interactive market maps and a product search feature help plan ahead for weekly shopping. To find out about musical guests and special events, check out the home page calendar or sign up to receive the weekly farmers’ market email newsletter.

The Seacoast Growers Association manages four area outdoor farmers’ markets in Portsmouth, Exeter, Durham and Dover. All markets welcome SNAP/EBT customers.

Posted in farmers' markets, SNAP/EBT | Leave a comment

How’s and Why’s of Eating With the Seasons

Kelsey MacDonald, Seacoast Eat Local Intern

spring

What Does Eating In Season Mean?
Eating in season is a way of celebrating the food products, especially produce available in your area at that time of year. This also means waiting to eat foods until they are available to you locally, which maybe a challenge at first. Eating only the freshest, local products will provide the richest flavors and highest nutritional value. Today this can be hard with all the commercial food options available, but you will find food coming into season exciting. And you will be ready for the new products to come in their bounty.

Spring is the time of new growth with products that are leafy and tender.

Summer provides light and cooling foods.

Fall provides the end of the light foods and the beginning of the warming food with its bountiful harvest.

Winter is a time of warming and hearty foods that keep us sustained.

late summer

Why Should I Eat in Season?

Fresher foods have more flavor and provide a higher nutrient content. Seasonal foods also have what the body need at that time of year. For example, in the summer produce has a high water content and natural sugars to help with hydration; in the winter foods tend to be heartier and more warming. At any time of year, without having to be harvested early and transported a long distance (which degrades nutrients), local foods will have more vitamins and phytonutrients.

You are supporting your neighbors and the local economy by shopping from farmers, markets or locally sourced restaurants. You are promoting a healthier environment by reducing the carbon footprint of the food from the field to your fork. Lastly, you are also reducing the packaging of your food exponentially, creating less waste overall.

How Do I Eat In Season?

Shop at a farm stand nearby or the farmer’s market regularly to purchase what is coming in and out of season. See the market schedule at: http://seacoastharvest.org/market/ .  Through direct sales from the farm, you are able to ask many questions about flavor profiles, flavor combinations and recipe ideas. There are also seasonal cookbooks that offer great suggestions on recipes, and how to prepare vegetables that may be new to you.

Signing up for a CSA (community supported agriculture) share is a great way to ensure you are able to try what is available each week (or bi-weekly). By paying up front, your farmer is able to plan for seeds, labor, equipment costs and more. If this is too much, try signing up for a CSA share with a friend or neighbor and learn the ropes together for the first year.

See more information at: http://seacoasteatlocal.org/find-local-food/csas/

Plan ahead and preserve:

Preserving, pickling, canning and freezing are great ways to ensure your fresh and local products are available to you with a longer shelf life. There are many possibilities and canning makes for great gifts too!

See http://seacoasteatlocal.org/kitchen-garden/food-preservation/ for tips and classes near you.

This may sound overwhelming, but an easy way to start is with freezer pickles:

freezer pickles

Ingredients

  • 4 pounds pickling cucumbers, sliced
  • 8 cups thinly sliced onions (about 8 medium)
  • 1/4 cup salt
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 4 cups sugar
  • 2 cups cider vinegar

Directions

  • Rinse 10 2-cup plastic containers and lids with boiling water. Dry thoroughly. Divide cucumbers, onions, salt and water between two large bowls. Let stand at room temperature 2 hours. Do not drain.
  • Add 2 cups sugar and 1 cup vinegar to each bowl; stir until sugar is dissolved. Transfer to prepared containers, leaving 1-in. headspace for expansion; freeze up to 6 weeks.
  • Thaw pickles in refrigerator 8 hours before using. Serve within 2 weeks after thawing. Yield: 10 pints.

http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/freezer-cucumber-pickles/print#ixzz3XcJFqHy3

 

Sources:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=faq&dbid=28

http://www.nourishlife.org/2011/03/eating-with-the-seasons/

http://www.justfood.org/csa

http://www.saga.co.uk/health/healthy-eating/seasonalfoodsbetterforyourbody.aspx

 

 

 

 

Posted in author: Sarah, nutrition, recipes, sources of local food | Leave a comment

The Return of a Few Favorites

 

Written by Emily Whitmore, SEL Intern

 

Spring has finally sprung! And so will a few crops that we’ve been missing throughout this long, snowy winter. As May and June are approaching, lets look at a few crops that will be available fresh at the markets!

One delicious ingredient that is very popular during the spring is rhubarb! Rhubarb is a vegetable, although it is commonly misidentified as a fruit due to its popular use in pies, jams and sauces. Untitled5Rhubarb’s crisp stalks taste sweet/tart and serve as the perfect refreshing snack to munch on as the days get warmer. The stalks can range in color from reddish pink to green and the difference is in the taste – the redder the stalk, the sweeter the taste. However, you must remember that the stalk is the only part of the plant that should be consumed. Rhubarb leaves must be avoided because they are poisonous and contain oxalic acid. This can be very damaging to the body if consumed in large quantity, eventually causing kidney failure.

Rhubarb isn’t just tasty, but it also provides many health benefits. It is notably high in fiber and also contains potassium, vitamin A, calcium and more.rhubarb-header In fact, one cup of cooked rhubarb has an equal amount of calcium than a glass of milk (although it is less bioavailable than calcium from dairy products)! Rhubarb is a perennial crop that is very low maintenance as it rarely suffers from disease or pests. It is typically harvested between April and June; so don’t miss your chance to pick up some fresh rhubarb at the market.

Another perennial vegetable that is available this time of the year is fresh asparagus. Many are probably familiar with green asparagus and its mild, earthy taste. However, some may be unaware of the different varieties of asparagus: purple and white.Untitled2 The purple varieties tend to be sweeter in flavor and less fibrous, however are more susceptible to disease. White asparagus is grown using the process of etiolation. Etiolation is the deprivation of light, and the absence of light disables the stalks from producing chlorophyll. Without the production of the pigment chlorophyll, the asparagus will not be given its green color, resulting in white asparagus. White asparagus is described to be more tender and subtle in flavor than green varieties. Untitled3Something that all varieties have in common is their nutritional content. Asparagus is very high in fiber, vitamin K and folate, so be sure to keep a look out for this nutritious vegetable in the upcoming months!

Lastly, towards the end of June we can expect to see the return of fresh strawberries! This popular member of the rose family is one of the first fruits to ripen in the spring. Strawberries can be confusing because despite their name, they are not a berry. Untitled4
By definition, a berry is a fleshy fruit produced from
a single plant ovary. Strawberries, on the other hand, are made up of several ovaries that were separate in a single flower. This is called an aggregate fruit, and another fruit that shares this characteristic are raspberries. Although they are not berries, strawberries are still exceptionally high in vitamin C and contain powerful antioxidants and phytonutrients. They are enjoyed in many ways including raw, cooked in desserts, jams, sauces, and more! Pair some fresh strawberries from Sugar Momma’s Maple farm with fresh rhubarb from Two Farmers Farm and make a pie, muffins, jams or even compote. See the recipe below for some ideas!

 

Strawberry-Rhubarb Compote

Servings: makes about 3.5 cups

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 pint strawberries, hulled and quartered lengthwise
  • 1 pound rhubarb, stalks only, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise, seeds scraped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

Combine all of the ingredients in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil over moderately high heat. Reduce the heat to moderately low and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the vanilla bean and serve warm over vanilla ice cream, angel food cake or waffles.

Recipe from http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/strawberry-rhubarb-compote

 

Asparagus and Strawberry Salad with Balsamic and Basil

Makes 2 appetizer sized or 1 sizable salad.

Ingredients

  • 5 large stalks asparagus, cut into 2 inch pieces
  • 1 cup halved or quartered fresh strawberries
  • 6 cups fresh greens (mesclun, baby spinach, romaine, mache — all of these will be just fine)
  • 1/4 cup tightly packed fresh basil
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 1/2 tabelspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tsp dijon mustard
  • 1 tsp agave or maple syrup
  • Sea salt and pepper to taste

Instructions
Bring a small pot of water to boil. Add the asparagus and blanch for 1-2 minutes till the stalks are still crunchy, but bright green and just tender enough to be palatable to you. Slice the basil into thin ribbons and, in a large bowl, combine the greens, asparagus, basil, and strawberries. Whisk together the oil, vinegar, mustard, syrup, and salt/pepper. Toss with the greens. Serve.

Recipe from http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/asparagus-strawberry-salad

 

 

Sources:

http://www.rhubarb-central.com/rhubarb-plant-facts.html

http://www.lathyrus-seed.com/paradise/vegetables/asparagus/asparagus.html

http://www.fruitsinfo.com/aggregate-fruit.php

 

Picture Sources:
http://www.recipetips.com/kitchen-tips/t–1672/asparagus-crowns.asp
https://grubtrotting.wordpress.com/2012/05/01/white-asparagus/

http://www.beckybakes.net/2010/06/23/fresh-strawberry-syrup/

https://gfgastronaut.wordpress.com/2008/06/

Posted in author: Sarah, nutrition, recipes | Leave a comment

Would You Like to Work With Us?

Now is your opportunity!  Seacoast Eat Local is hiring a Program Coordinator to assist the Director in executing our many projects.

Position

The Program Coordinator is responsible for the execution of the marketing and programming efforts of Seacoast Eat Local. In this newly established role, the Program Coordinator will be the key person for organizing and implementing the work of the organization. This position reports to the Director of Programs.

The position is 40 hours per week at $15.00 per hour with benefits.

Responsibilities

● Coordinate and manage the SNAP, Seacoast Harvest, and Winter Farmers’ Market programs with support from the Director of Programs and the Board of Directors

● Advance Seacoast Eat Local’s presence in social media through content generation/sourcing, posting, monitoring, analysis and reporting

● Lead content generation and email marketing efforts

● Support fundraising efforts by performing outreach for donations and sponsorships and by participating in grant proposals as needed

● Plan and coordinate the Seacoast Eat Local Winter Farmers’ Markets including onsite hands-on presence of all (currently twelve) markets

● Manage the setup/takedown and coverage of the SNAP/Debit booth at the farmers’ markets, both summer (currently five per week) and winter

● Maintain accurate records, correspondence, and donor database records

● Participate in and assist with implementation of new programs and events that extend the work and mission of Seacoast Eat Local

● Mobilize and coordinate a pool of dedicated volunteers to carry out program activities

● Develop work assignments and projects and provide task supervision to assigned volunteers

● Possess and continually increase knowledge of local food sources, connections and trends

Qualifications

● Bachelors Degree or equivalent, relevant work experience

● Minimum of 1 – 3 years experience in organizing and implementing programs and events, preferably in a nonprofit environment

● Relevant experience in event management

● Strong proficiency in general computer, software and device use

● Demonstrated aptitude for learning and using new technology and software programs

● Ability to solve problems and manage conflict to ensure strong collaborative program execution

● Excellent verbal and written communication skills, with exceptional attention to detail, and the ability to create content for a variety of needs and audiences

● Demonstrated ability to work without close supervision, creating and executing a solid work plan for her/himself

● Ability and willingness to work nights and weekends

● Enthusiasm for being in front of the public at events and markets

● Personal qualities and a communication style that reflects professionalism, integrity, credibility, and a commitment to and passion for the mission of Seacoast Eat Local

For consideration, please email your cover letter and resume to info@seacoasteatlocal.org by May 31st.

Posted in help wanted | Leave a comment

Cooking Class: The Many Colors of Carrots, May 7

Eastman's CornerThe Many Colors of Carrots
Kath Gallant and Tracey Miller
Location: The Farm at Eastman’s Corner, Kensington, NH
Date: Thursday, May 7, 2015
Time: 6:30 – 8 pm
Fee: Free, registration requested

Carrots aren’t just for dipping! Learn how to enjoy the mighty carrot in soups, salads, sauces and more. Kath and Tracey will show you the many colors of carrots and how to get this nutrient-dense food into your diet and light up your plate. Carrots are one of the richest sources of vitamin A and support your heart, your lungs and your eyes. Bunny up and join Kath and Tracey to explore the wonderful world of carrots.

Teachers: Kath Gallant is the owner of the Blue Moon Evolution restaurant and has been offering up delicious, healthy food for 20 years. Tracey Miller graduated from the Institute for Integrative Nutrition and has provided health coaching and cooking classes for hundreds of women and families.

For more information: www.eastmanscorner.com

Posted in learning | Leave a comment

Heifer Parade with Food & Fiddle, May 2

Heifer Day 2014, Canterbury Shaker VillageHeifer Parade with Food & Fiddle
Brookford Farm
Location: Canterbury Shaker Village, Canterbury, NH
Date: Saturday, May 2, 2015
Time: 10 am–3 pm, parade will begin approximately at 11 am
Fee: Free admission

Celebrate the return of the spring to the Village pastures with a parade of heifers to their first spring grass. Maypole dancing, food, outdoor barn dancing, and make-your-own head wreaths, tutus and May baskets will be available throughout the day. Parade will begin approximately at 11:00 am. Come early and decorate yourself for the parade or wear your best spring bonnet! Prizes will be awarded for the best hat. Self-guided exhibits are open at no charge. Guided tours are available for $10 per person at 11:00, 1:00 & 3:00.

Register and let us know you’re coming: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/heifer-parade-with-food-fiddle-tickets-15230028425

For more information: http://www.shakers.org/may-2-heifer-parade-with-food-fiddle/

Posted in events, farms | Leave a comment

Maine Scale Sealing (Certification) with State Inspector, April 28

Scale Sealing (Certification) with State Inspector
Location: McDougal Orchards, 201 Hanson Ridge Rd., Springvale, ME 04083
Date: Tuesday, April 28, 2015
Time: 8 am – 11 am (possibly to noon, if needed)

Michael Caldero of the Maine State office of Weights and Measures will certify the accuracy of your scales at this event. Please RSVP to McDougal Orchards, 324-5054, or mcdorch@gwi.net, to indicate when you can arrive with your scale(s.) Be sure to have your scale calibrated ahead of time; the inspector certifies the accuracy of the scale, but doesn’t do calibrations.

Posted in farmers' markets | Leave a comment
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