Jess’ Post: Market Community

imagesHey everyone!

Last Saturday was an amazing market. By the end of the day close to 2,500 people had come! About half way through the day my mom stopped by to buy some goodies. Once she left to peruse for dog treats I looked around and smiled, realizing how much of a community these markets have become, as well as how grateful I am to be a part of them.

In the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, community is defined as:

A group of people who live in the same area

A group of people who have the same interests, religion, race, and

A group of nations.

This year in almost all of my classes at UNH, the word community has come up as the solution to many of ‘life’s’ problems. What I find really interesting is how media and technology has both increased and decreased these problems. For a community to thrive, communication and interaction must occur. This happens best in a personal setting in the present rather than through a screen, but at the same time, social media has created ways for community to blossom by connecting people. Really, what I’m getting at is that everyone at the indoor markets has done a great job of using technology and media to create community- both staff, vendors, and market-goers included. You can feel it when you’re there… and the numbers sure show it!

For this week’s food waste challenge I challenge you to put a piece of paper and a pen next to your trash bin or compost pile to record what you throw away for a week. At the end of the week, look back upon what you tossed and decide whether you could have disposed of it differently. Could your beet greens be used in a salad? Could you have stored something differently to make the food last longer? Could you place your leftovers in a part of your fridge that would force you to eat them before they go bad? Look at each item and think of what you might be able to do differently next time to reduce how much you throw away. In a couple weeks record what you throw away again and see if it has changed or decreased! The point is to become a conscious consumer and a individual who consciously decides to throw something away. It’s a shift of habit, but even the smallest changes can make a difference!

Be well-

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